How to Change the Background Picture on a Mac: 7 Steps
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The background on your Mac computer can get boring after viewing it day in and day out. If it's time for a change, Apple's System Preferences gives you that option. The Mac contains several preset pictures from which to choose, but you are welcome to select your own photos as well. If you want to make sure you don't constantly see the same picture, you can also set the background as a slideshow of pictures that change after a set period.

EditSteps

  1. 1
    Click the "Apple" menu icon and select "System Preferences."
  2. 2
    Select "Desktop & Screen Saver" from System Preferences and then select the "Desktop" tab.
  3. 3
    Click any of the folders, such as "Nature" or "Abstract," from the left pane to view images. To choose iPhoto images, select a library from the iPhoto list; if you don't see any libraries under iPhoto, click the left-side arrow to expand the list. Click "+" to choose a folder or picture from any location on your Mac
  4. 4
    Click an image from the right pane to apply that image to your desktop.
  5. 5
    Click the drop-down menu, located just above the right pane, and select how the image should be displayed. "Fill Screen" forces the image to occupy the entire screen, even if it must zoom or cut off portions of the image. "Fit to Screen" makes the photo as large as possible without distorting or cutting the image. "Stretch to Fill Screen" fills the screen but will stretch or squish the image if necessary. "Center" keeps the original size and positions it in the center of the screen. "Tile" repeats the image to fill the screen.
  6. 6
    Check "Change Picture" to use a slideshow of various images. Set the change frequency in the right-side drop-down menu. To display these images randomly, check "Random Order."
  7. 7
    Exit the Desktop & Screen Saver window when you are satisfied with your changes

EditTips

  • You can use virtually any graphic file format for your desktop photo, including JPEG, GIF, TIFF and PDF formats.

Article Info

Categories: Mac

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